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Who needs vision correction?

Anyone who is finding difficulty in seeing far-away objects or near-by objects needs vision correction. Sometimes, one might want to protect their eyes from exposure to excess sunlight or excess screen-time without a prescription in hand. Find more details under Our Lenses

MYOPIA (SHORTSIGHTEDNESS)

Myopia (Shortsightedness) occurs when the light rays focus much before the retina, which makes distant objects appear blurred. This occurs because of the shape of the eye being longer.

Myopic vision

Light rays focusing before retina in Myopia

Myopia is commonly discovered in children between the ages of 6 and 12 years and advances during the teenage years with minimal change post that. Common symptoms associated with Myopia are difficulty in seeing distant objects like reading road signs & bus numbers, frequent squinting of eyes and headaches due to strain on eyes. Myopia can be corrected by refocusing the light rays onto the eye’s retina through prescription glasses and/or contact lenses.

HYPEROPIA (LONGSIGHTEDNESS)

Hyperopia (Longsightedness) occurs when the light rays focus much beyond the retina, which makes near objects appear blurred. This occurs because of the shape of the eye being shorter.

Hyperopic vision

Light rays focusing before retina in Hyperopia

Often inherited, longsightedness to a small extent is usually present in babies and children because of their eye shape. As they grow, the eye size gets corrected and hence the vision also gets corrected – generally by the age of seven or eight.

Detecting Hyperopia is generally difficult because of the mildness of the symptoms. Hyperopia can be corrected by refocusing the light rays onto the eye’s retina through prescription glasses and/or contact lenses. The eye is otherwise healthy and hence does not require any special precaution.

Astigmatism

Astigmatism is a condition when the light rays fail to form a single focus on the retina which makes all objects – near or far appear distorted and blurred. This happens due to the irregular shape of the cornea in the eye.

Astigmatic vision

Light rays focusing on multiple points

Astigmatism is most often present from birth. It could also develop post an eye injury or disease.

Blurry images of near and far objects, constant squinting of eyes are some symptoms of astigmatism.

Astigmatism can easily be corrected by refocusing the light rays onto a single plane through prescription glasses and/or contact lenses.

Correction Tool

Prescription for glasses is different from prescription for contact lenses. It is best to request the practitioner for both versions or consult an experienced optometrist, as they would know how to convert the prescription. But it is very important to know what the prescription in hand refers to – glasses or contact lenses.

Which Eye

O.D (Oculus Dexter) refers to the right eye and O.S (Oculus Sinister) refers to the left eye. The correction in each eye is independent of the other eye.

Sphere / Spherical / SPH

This refers to the amount of lens power prescribed to correct nearsightedness or farsightedness. A “-“ or minus number indicates nearsightedness (myopia) and a “+” or plus number indicates farsightedness (hyperopia). The absolute number indicates the severity of the condition. As the name suggests, spherical does a uniform correction along all axes of the eye.

The number is measured in Diopters which is a unit of measure for the refractive power of a lens.

Cylinder / Cylindrical / CYL

This refers to the amount of lens power prescribed to correct astigmatism. A “-“ or minus number indicates correction of nearsighted (myopic) astigmatism and a “+” or plus number indicates correction of farsighted (hyperopic) astigmatism. As the name suggests, cylindrical does a correction only along a particular axis of the eye. The orientation of this axis is defined by “Axis” which is a part of the prescription.

Cylinder power is also measured in Diopters (a unit of measure for the refractive power of a lens).

Axis

Axis defines the orientation of the axis along which no cylindrical power would be present. The cylindrical power would be present along an axis which is 90 degrees away from the prescribed axis. Axis is measured in degrees where number 90 refers to the vertical meridian and 180 refers to the horizontal meridian

Pupillary Distance / PD

PD is the distance between the pupils of the eyes and is measured in millimeters. This measurement is important for fitting the lens onto the frame so that optical center of the lens is in line with the optical center of the eyes. Not sure on how to measure it? Click here to know more.

Selecting the right lens is as important – if not more important – than selecting the right frame. A wrong choice of lens will not only affect the aesthetic appeal but will also not provide a comfortable vision correction experience.

Before moving onto the various options in the market, a quick look at the technical terminologies involving lenses:

  • Index of Refraction / Refractive Index is a relative measure of how efficiently the material refracts (or bends) light. This is again a function of how fast light travels within a material.Hence, higher the refractive index, higher is the light bending property of a material and hence lesser will be the lens thickness.

Thumb rule to remember related to lens

In the image, observe how the light bends as it travels through the prism – This is because of the material’s refractive index.

Again, in the image, observe how the white light gets split into the component colors (colors of the rainbow). This is because of the dispersion of light.

Higher the refractive index, higher is the light bending property and thinner will be the lens.

Moving onto the materials available at hand, there are broadly 2 materials used for lens making – Glass and Plastic. While the former is no longer predominantly in use (glass provides a far thinner lens but is comparatively heavier than plastics), the latter has seen many more variants evolve in recent times.

Technical name CR 39 PC Hi-Index Super Hi-Index
Refractive Index 1.49 1.6 1.67 1.74
Thickness Similar to glass 15% thinner than CR 39 30% thinner than CR 39 40% thinner than CR 39
Weight Lighter than glass 10% lighter than CR 39 Lighter than glass Lighter than glass
Maintenance Low Low Low Low
Suitable for Low powers Low to Medium powers High powers Very High Powers
Remarks In-built UV protection, Highly Shatter Resistant
Technical name CR 39 PC Hi-Index Super Hi-Index
Refractive Index 1.49 1.6 1.67 1.74
Thickness Similar to glass 15% thinner than CR 39 30% thinner than CR 39 40% thinner than CR 39
Weight Lighter than glass 10% lighter than CR 39 Lighter than glass Lighter than glass
Maintenance Low Low Low Low
Suitable for Low powers Low to Medium powers High powers Very High Powers
Remarks In-built UV protection, Highly Shatter Resistant
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